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News

Welcome to the Alchemy blog, here is where we will be highlighting events and news from around the winery. This is your blog page, add intro text before through the content management tools or add blog posts through the blogging tools: Learn about adding/editing blog posts, or Learn about editing the text. This page could be repurposed for news only - which works pretty well.

 

David Eckert
 
September 23, 2018 | David Eckert

Best of Class Chardonnay!

I am honored to announce that our 2017 Chardonnay was recently awarded Best of Class at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair!

This prestigious competition is limited to Sonoma County wines and is the largest regional wine competition in the United States. Just over 1,000 wines were entered into the competition, with only 35 wines chosen as Best of Class.

The wine judges come to Sonoma County from around the nation, and in some cases, travel from other countries. The blind tastings are carefully controlled, to assure a fair and accurate outcome. 

-David Eckert

Owner/ Winemaker/ Grower

Time Posted: Sep 23, 2018 at 11:23 AM
David Eckert
 
May 24, 2018 | David Eckert

Wine Tasting - Getting Started

The ability to sniff out and untangle the subtle threads that weave into complex wine aromas is essential for tasting. Try holding your nose while you swallow a mouthful of wine; you will find that most of the flavor is muted. Your nose is the key to your palate. Once you learn how to give wine a good sniff, you’ll begin to develop the ability to isolate flavors—to notice the way they unfold and interact—and, to some degree, assign language to describe them.

This is exactly what wine professionals—those who make, sell, buy, and write about wine—are able to do. For any wine enthusiast, it’s the pay-off for all the effort.

While there is no one right or wrong way to learn how to taste, some “rules” do apply.

First and foremost, you need to be methodical and focused. Find your own approach and consistently follow it. Not every single glass or bottle of wine must be analyzed in this way, of course. But if you really want to learn about wine, a certain amount of dedication is required. Whenever you have a glass of wine in your hand, make it a habit to take a minute to stop all conversation, shut out all distraction and focus your attention on the wine’s appearance, scents, flavors and finish.

You can run through this mental checklist in a minute or less, and it will quickly help you to plot out the compass points of your palate. Of course, sipping a chilled rosé from a paper cup at a garden party doesn’t require the same effort as diving into a well-aged Bordeaux served from a Riedel Sommelier Series glass. But those are the extreme ends of the spectrum. Just about everything you are likely to encounter falls somewhere in between.

Time Posted: May 24, 2018 at 10:28 AM
David Eckert
 
May 15, 2015 | David Eckert

Wine Serving Tips

Now that you have taken the time to learn how-to-taste wine, the regions and grapes of the world, reading a wine label and the essentials for buying wine, it’s time to drink it! 

For starters, make sure that your wine is being served at its absolute best. To do that, pay attention to these three tenets of wine service: Glassware, temperature and preservation.

Glassware:
Each wine has something unique to offer your senses. Most wine glasses are specifically shaped to accentuate those defining characteristics, directing wine to key areas of the tongue and nose, where they can be fully enjoyed. While wine can be savored in any glass, a glass designed for a specific wine type helps you to better experience its nuances. Outfit your house with a nice set of stems you will reap the rewards.

Temperature:
All wine is stored at the same temperature, regardless of its color. But reds and whites are consumed at quite different temperatures. Too often people drink white wines too cold and red wines too warm, limiting how much you can enjoy the wine. A white that’s too cold will be flavorless and a red that’s too warm is often flabby and alcoholic.

Time Posted: May 15, 2015 at 3:14 PM